The National Football League is about to have its best two weeks and its worst two weeks all at the same time. Most of the "good" has been brought about by the incredible playoff games the league has offered fans over the past couple of weeks. And, there is a genuine excitement for the February 13th championship game that will pit the Cincinnati Bengals against the Los Angeles Rams.

While the league is basking the glow of that goodness there is a lot of tarnish on the NFL Shield this morning too. You've probably heard allegations by two former coaches that their franchises actually encouraged them to lose football games in order to improve their position in the NFL Draft.

Football Life via YouTube
Football Life via YouTube
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There has also been a lawsuit filed by Miami Dolphins former Coach Brian Flores that alleges racial discrimination in the league's hiring practices, at least where coaches and in particular head coaches are concerned.

The latest public relations debacle the NFL is having to field questions over concerns a proposal by Hamilton County Ohio administrators. That proposal involved a watch party for the "big game" inside Cincinnati's Paul Brown Stadium. The plan was to invite Bengals fans to come to cheer on the team and watch the game on the stadium's huge television screens.

WLWT via YouTube
WLWT via YouTube
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Many people would consider such a watch party a no brainer. Many franchises and college teams have done similar events. But alas, the NFL is proving once again their desire for fans to enjoy the product is not nearly as great as their desire to keep all the money.

Yeah, the NFL denied the Bengals request to invite fans over for a Super Bowl Party.

If you couldn't make out the reason for the rejection because of the small print and abundance of NFL bullpoop, the reason for rejecting the request was based on " legal and logistical barriers". Is that lawyer-speak for "we're the NFL and we don't really care about fans"?

To be fair, there are probably a lot of things that people like me and you don't understand about how the NFL and other monopolies operate. No, wait, sorry, the NFL is not a monopoly, it is more like a cartel. You know, like the ones they have in Mexico and Colombia.

Bret Kavanaugh via Unsplash.com
Bret Kavanaugh via Unsplash.com
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But regardless of whether you call them a monopoly or a cartel, it's been made pretty clear that the NFL has a big hammer and they will swing it at anyone who "threatens their brand". Especially if it's someone as unimportant as the fans.

Thankfully the league can't mandate private Super Bowl parties.

Phillip Goldsberry via Unsplash.com
Phillip Goldsberry via Unsplash.com
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Now, I know this would be a long shot but Baker Mayfield allegedly lives at Cleveland's Stadium. I mean that's what the commercials seem to suggest right? Maybe Bengals fans could make the short trip to Cleveland to... Nah watching football in Cleveland is like watching football in Atlanta, the vibe of the room just doesn't lend itself to winning.

And if you're having a party on Sunday the 13th, might we suggest you offer these kinds of treats for your guests, or else you will be talked about.

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