The next solar eclipse will be seen in the afternoon and early evening sky over much of the United States this Sunday, May 20.

Its supposed to be a spectacular site for those who are lucky enough to see it.

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon gets directly between Earth and the sun.

If we're able to see it in Shreveport-Bossier, it will be a partial solar eclipse for us and most of the United States and Canada. The sun will set before any of it will be visible on the East Coast.

You should view it safely.

NASA has also set up a nifty interactive Google map showing times of the eclipse -- click on the map and it'll show when the eclipse will begin and end at any given point in the world. The times are set to "Coordinated Universal Time," which is seven hours ahead of California.

According to NASA, the annular eclipse will begin at sunrise local time in southern China; pass over Hong Kong; Taipei, Taiwan; and Tokyo before hitting its greatest extent in the Pacific Ocean near Alaska's Aleutian Islands. After entering California, the moon's shadow will block almost all sunlight from Reno, Nev.; the Grand Canyon in Arizona; Albuquerque, N.M.; and Lubbock, Texas.

During the annular eclipse, the moon will be analogous to a black dime in front of a shiny penny, with a thin “ring of fire” — sunlight that streams around the moon.

The moon will block up to 94 percent of sunlight for those directly under the narrow path.

The “ring of fire” will appear “as thin as a basketball hoop with a half-inch rim seen face on from about 160 feet away. The sky won’t turn dark but for a few minutes it will transform into a strange “counterfeit twilight,”.

According to NASA, the annular eclipse will begin at sunrise local time in southern China; pass over Hong Kong; Taipei, Taiwan; and Tokyo before hitting its greatest extent in the Pacific Ocean near Alaska's Aleutian Islands. After entering California, the moon's shadow will block almost all sunlight from Reno, Nev.; the Grand Canyon in Arizona; Albuquerque, N.M.; and Lubbock, Texas.

People along but outside the main path of the annular eclipse will see a partial solar eclipse, in which the moon appears to take a bite out of the sun. Again, do not look directly at the sunlight.

The annular eclipse will be visible from 33 National Parks, including the Grand Canyon. It will also cast its shadow on Southern China and Japan, including Tokyo, on Monday, local time.